Home Page V9

Takaomi Taira

Recent progress in neurosurgical treatment of dystonias

Zbigniew Wszolek

Discovering the Genetic Causes of Parkinson Disease

Petri Auvinen

Are microbiome changes important? - No

Jeffrey Boertien

Are microbiome changes important? - Yes

Mark Stacy

Physcial exercise is neurorestorative in Parkinson's disease: - No

Giuseppe Frazzitta

Physcial exercise is neurorestorative in Parkinson's disease: - Yes

Gesine Paul Visse

Growth factor infusions

Compendium

Fragment 5.1

Parkinsonism (Segments 1-10) The clinical hallmarks of (motor) parkinsonism are shown in this video fragment. Segments 1-3 display bradykinesia, segment 4 hypokinesia, segment 5 the typical parkinsonian rest tremor, and segment 6 rigidity with the cogwheel phenomenon in various patients suffering from motor parkinsonism. Segment 7 shows the loss of postural reflexes with instability, the phenomena of propulsion (segment 8) and retropulsion (segment 9), and stooped posture (segment 10) in motor parkinsonism (courtesy Erik Wolters).

Fragment 5.2

Parkinson’s disease (Segments 1-5) This fragment shows a 6o-year-old woman suffering from right > left-sided Parkinson’s disease, with hypokinesia (masked face: segment 1), reduced arm swing (segment 2), tremor (segment 3), and bradykinesia in the right body-half (segments 4 and 5) (courtesy Teus van Laar).

Fragment 9.1

REM sleep behaviour disorder (1) Nocturnal video-polysomnography of a 78-yearold male patient with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD). In this patient with severe comorbid depression, RBD manifests with expression of joy and laughter (courtesy Christian Baumann).

Fragment 9.2

REM sleep behaviour disorder (2) Nocturnal video-polysomnography of a 71-yearold female patient with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. On the left side, sleep electro-encephalogram (bottom), electro-oculogram (top) and electro- myogram are visible. The patient is in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. REM sleep behaviour in this patient manifests primarily with expression of fear and screaming, but not with motor activity (courtesy Christian Baumann).